Don’t Miss These Sharp Gottcha Gold Two Year Olds at the April Hastings Paddock Sale!

Forward-training youngsters by Gottcha Gold will make terrific additions to your stable!

Want a quick way to build yourself an awesome racing stable for 2018? Visit the Hastings Paddock Sale and check out these two forward-training two year olds by MGSW Gottcha Gold! This gelding, Kesse, and filly, Hilariously Naughty, get high marks from their trainer! They offer exactly what you’re looking for in bright, smart youngsters who have what it takes to win! 

Not only do they exhibit the power and athleticism you look for in racing prospects, they handle all of their lessons like pros. We believe they get these qualities from their sire, Gottcha Gold, and their families are just as strong. Take a look at their info below, and check out the links to their catalog pages. We’re sure you’ll agree these youngsters have a lot to offer.

By MGSW & Black Type Sire Gottcha Gold

Our horses’ sire is MGSW Gottcha Gold; he is a half-brother to G1SP American Freedom! As a racehorse, Gottcha Gold was top class: he won stakes at 3, 4, and 5, including the G3 Philip Iselin Handicap. Gottcha Gold won $1,258,000 CDN and was first/second in 11 stakes, including the then G1 Pimlico Special & the G1 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile. Gottcha Gold ranks among the leading Canadian stallions and offers the speed and class of the Mr. Prospector line through his sire, Coronado’s Quest. Gottcha Gold has sired over 6% black type horses/starter lifetime!

Strong Dam Lines Add to These Youngsters’ Quality

Kesse’s dam, See You Again, is by the great Holy Bull, he a top sire and outstanding broodmare sire. He is the broodmare sire of champion Judy the Beauty and good sire, Munnings. See You Again has had two foals to race, both winners. Kesse’s family also includes a number of additional black type stakes winners.

Hilariously Naughty, like Kesse, also shows the promise and talent of her sire. Her family is strong, with her dam, I’mNaughtyandnice, a SW; and half sister to Grooms Derby, another black type SW. She has had two foals to race, and 1 winner. The family includes several additional black type stakes winners and stakes-placed horses. I’mNaughtyandnice is by Straight Man (MGSP and G1SP), a son of the top sire Saint Ballado.

Superb Opportunity to Own Quality Two Year Olds – Come See Them April 7!

Both of these promising young horses can provide you with a terrific way to start or add to your stable for 2018! Enjoy racing this year with one or both of these sharp Gottcha Gold youngsters! They’re athletic and all business, with great minds! Definitely nice additions you’ll have fun rooting for!

You can see these quality two year olds at the Hastings Paddock Sale Preview on April 7, at 1 pm. If you would like more information, please contact us at (250) 546-2476 or email strideawaythoroughbreds@hotmail.com.

LOCAL HORSES OUT OF TOWN

Mike Anderson
Entries
March 28 – Turf Paradise

Run Harvey Run Race 6 Allowance
March 31Turf Paradise

Manning Race 8 Claiming $6,250
James R. Brown
Entries
March 31Turf Paradise

Power Corrupt Race 5 Wildcat H.
Fire Boss Race 7 Claiming $3,500
Toccet’s Charm Race 8 Claiming $6,250
April 2 – Turf Paradise

Maggie’s Guy Race 7 Claiming $3,000
Sandi Gann
Entries
April 2Turf Paradise

Hansen’s Victory Race 5 Allowance

Results
March 27 – Turf Paradise
Sorryaboutnothing finished 4th beaten 4 3/4 lengths Race 5 View Chart    
Philip Hall
Entries
March 28 – Turf Paradise

Tattooed Kitty Race 7 Allowance
April 2Turf Paradise

Fabulous Lady Race 6 Starter Optional Claiming $5,000

Claims
March 27 – Turf Paradise
Midnight Reveler finished 8th beaten 10 lengths Race 8 View Chart    

HASTINGS WORKOUTS FOR TUESDAY, MARCH 27TH

HASTINGS WORKS -PATTI TUBBS PHOTO
Tuesday, March 27, 2018
HASTINGS RACECOURSE — (Dirt) Track Sloppy
3 Furlongs
Horse Time Rank

Always Sunny :36.00 H 1
Hail the Princess :38.20 H 3
In Fine Fashion :39.40 H 5
Jayna :36.60 H 2
Lookout Taylor :39.20 H 4
HASTINGS RACECOURSE — (Dirt) Track Sloppy
4 Furlongs
Horse Time Rank

Morning Blurs :49.60 H 1
Pumpkin :52.80 H 3
Seven Chances :52.80 H 3
Shadow Dancer :52.00 B 2

Reducing Horse Racing Fatalities: Where Do We Go From Here?

Fatal injuries in North American flat racing horses has decreased by 23%, but there’s still work to be done.

By     |    Jan 19, 2018    |    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The occurrence of fatal injuries to horses in flat racing in North America has decreased by 23% since the inception of standardized injury reporting into the Jockey Club’s Equine Injury Database. | Photo: Anne M. Eberhardt/The Horse

The occurrence of fatal injuries to horses in flat racing in North America has decreased by 23% since the inception of standardized injury reporting into the Jockey Club’s Equine Injury Database.

The declining trend in fatalities began in 2013, and achieved statistical significance by 2015. This reduction, we believe, can be attributed to meaningful change within the culture of horse racing as expressed in multiple safety initiatives.

In Kentucky, this change has manifested not only as a decrease in racing fatalities, but also decreases in regulatory veterinarian-initiated scratches for unsoundness and the number of horses observed to be unsound post-race.

These findings are evidence that the overall health of the racing population has improved. Multiple safety initiatives have been implemented and credited for contributing to the improved safety record. Examples include:

  • Constraints on traction devices on horse shoes;
  • Changes to therapeutic medication regulations;
  • Systematic and objective racing surface monitoring and management;
  • Implementation of “voided claim” regulations;
  • The National Thoroughbred Racing Association’s Safety and Integrity Alliance accreditation of racetracks;
  • Necropsy programs and mortality review panels;
  • Employment of safety stewards; and
  • The adoption of an Association of Racing Commissioners’ Model Rule on the veterinarians’ list

Others assert that the decreased occurrence in fatalities is an expression of the Hawthorne Effect, in which there is an improved outcome as a consequence of a population’s awareness of being observed. This is perhaps not so rewarding as the idea that the combined effort of the entire spectrum of racing stakeholders made it a safer sport. But at the end of the day, either way, we’ll take it. The 23% reduction in racing fatalities is not an abstraction. Hundreds of horses did not die that, in the past, might well have.

The important message is that the occurrence of racing fatalities is not immutable. This should serve both as encouragement and warning. Encouragement in that positive change is possible, and so efforts to improve safety should, and must, continue. There is additional work to be done through investigating biomarkers of early onset orthopedic disease, improving decision making at all levels that further safeguards the long-term health of the horse during and after its racing career, identifying business models that incentivize human and equine health and safety, and developing relevant and engaging continuing education programs for all those in contact with race horses.

And the warning? Change can also be negative. Complacency, the assertion of a mission accomplished, puts horses and their riders as well as the sport as a whole at risk, should racing fatalities be allowed to increase as a consequence of inertia and a loss of vigilance. The occurrence of racing fatalities in North America continues to exceed that experienced elsewhere in the world.

Until North America can legitimately be acknowledged as a leader in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of racehorses and those who ride or drive them, our work is far from done.

CONTACT—Mary Scollay, DVM—mary.scollay@ky.gov—859/246-2040—Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, Lexington, Kentucky

A Closer Look at Racehorse Welfare

A look at racing ethics could help researchers and industry members acknowledge rightful concerns from a well-meaning public, help resolve misconceptions, and contribute to better equine welfare.

Researchers have recently conducted an overall look into the ethics of horse racing. Their work not only helps acknowledge the rightful concerns of a well-meaning public and contributes to better equine welfare but also helps resolve certain misconceptions. | Photo: Anne M. Eberhardt/The Horse

“Poor racehorses! They lead such a sad life!”

Or do they?

As animal welfare awareness spreads, and the internet helps spread it, public concerns over certain equestrian sports are increasing. But many of these concerns could stem from a lack of understanding about the way the sport functions, said Camie Heleski, MS, PhD, an instructor and adviser in the University of Kentucky equine science and management program, in Lexington.

It’s important to address these concerns from a scientific perspective, however. That’s why researchers have recently conducted an overall look into the ethics of horse racing. Their work not only helps acknowledge the rightful concerns of a well-meaning public and contributes to better equine welfare but also helps resolve certain misconceptions.

“The horse racing industry gets a lot of media coverage, which makes it extremely visually impactful for the public,” Heleski said. She presented her work at the 2017 International Society for Equitation Science Symposium, held Nov. 22-26 in Wagga Wagga, Australia.

Heleski and her fellow researchers used a scientific ethical evaluation framework she designed in 2012 to objectively explore what’s going on in horse racing. They identified five major areas of concern:

  • Whip use;
  • Horse wastage/career conversion;
  • Racing of very young horses;
  • Medication use; and
  • Management.

Whip use, she said, is a valid concern because evidence shows that even padded whips are painful. Studies have also indicated that they don’t make horses run faster.

“My experience is that once you have conditioned racehorses, if they want to run fast, they’ll do it,” Heleski said. “If not, there’s nothing you can do to convince them to go faster. Even retired Thoroughbreds still spend a decent amount of time running fast against the horses in the next pasture.”

Whipping regulations should evolve in response to the public voice, she said. But that doesn’t mean the whip should be banned entirely, as this could be dangerous for both horse and jockey—and even others nearby if a horse gets out of control.

“Jockeys’ legs are too high to be able to do anything effective to control the horse,” Heleski said. “They need that whip to do a pop on the shoulder and get their attention back.

“But we also need to accept that the public doesn’t want to see horses getting whipped,” she continued. “We don’t need to be whipping down the stretch. They don’t go faster when they’re getting whipped.”

Wastage, on the other hand, is not as worrisome as it once was, Heleski said.

“We keep seeing people bashing the horse racing industry on social media, especially with regards to what happens with retired horses,” she said. “But the industry has been working hard to keep wastage rates to a minimum, like keeping adoption fees low, developing rehoming centers, and contributing prize money to reconversion programs. And it’s working. It’s just remarkable what these horses, only 16 months off the track, are capable of doing.”

Transformed into competitive riding horses, off-track Thoroughbreds have gained a lot of attention across the country, especially in regions near major racetracks. “In Lexington, for example, it’s really become an especially popular type of horse,” she said. “A nice niche has been created for those horses there.”

The racing of young horses is also not a serious welfare concern, Heleski said. Trained appropriately following scientific guidelines, 2-year-olds actually benefit from the early workouts.

“People want to know, ‘Why are we racing babies?’” she said. “But recent bone physiology research suggests that sensible conditioning and racing is actually better for the soundness of these horses than waiting till they’re 5, 4, or even 3.”

As far as medication use is concerned, it’s a complicated issue because public perception will always affect it. “I don’t have a problem with horses getting Lasix or Salix for EIPH,” or exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, she said. “But the public does. Unfortunately, chances are the public perception isn’t going to work in favor of educating people about which medications make sense. In the end, we’ll probably just have to go clean slate—take on a zero-tolerance policy for medications.”

An issue that is of considerable concern, but less in the public eye, is how the horses are managed, Heleski said. “It’s personally my biggest concern in the racing industry,” she said. “These horses spend a lot of time in the stall. You do see the unusual racehorse facility that allows the horses to go out and run around a little bit. But we need to be asking ourselves, ‘How can we let the active racing horse have a somewhat more normal life?’ And by that I mean more freedom of movement, more forage, and more access to friends.”

One possibility is to encourage tracks to have more turnout areas for horses in active racing, she said. Another option is actually letting young horses in training stay at the home farm and even let them go out in the field with other horses.

Some “bold” owners and trainers are already allowing this, she added. “They’ve decided they’re going to accept that occasional kick or bite mark in exchange for the benefits they see,” Heleski said.

Overall, it’s important for the industry to recognize the welfare concerns of the horse, and not just during his active years. “If we’re going to use horses for entertainment and sport, we’re going to have to consider the full lifespan of the horse,” she said. “If we’re in a position to make enhancements, we owe the horse that and should do so whenever we can.”

And while horse racing is in the public spotlight, other disciplines face similar welfare issues—but with less public outcry. People in various disciplines would do well to support each other rather than criticize each other, Heleski added.

“Don’t throw stones if you don’t want your own industry to also be closely inspected,” she said. “Nobody is completely without flaw. We’re supposed to be in this together, not taking down individual bits and pieces.”

About The Author

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Christa Lesté-Lasserre is a freelance writer based in France. A native of Dallas, Texas, Lesté-Lasserre grew up riding Quarter Horses, Appaloosas, and Shetland Ponies. She holds a master’s degree in English, specializing in creative writing, from the University of Mississippi in Oxford and earned a bachelor’s in journalism and creative writing with a minor in sciences from Baylor University in Waco, Texas. She currently keeps her two Trakehners at home near Paris. Follow Lesté-Lasserre on Twitter @christalestelas.

TODAYS BLOODHORSE NEWS

Steve Haskin’s Derby Dozen – March 27, 2018
Runaway Ghost Dominant in Sunland Derby Victory

Noble Indy Takes Louisiana Derby

Magnum Moon, Sporting Chance Look to Arkansas Derby

Promises Fulfilled, Audible Have Florida Derby Tuneups

Catholic Boy Strong in Final Florida Derby Breeze

Gronkowski Staying Home for Burradon Stakes

Noble Indy Moves Up in NTRA 3-Year-Old Poll

Derby Hopeful Lone Sailor Well Worth Purchase Price

Strike Power Sharp in Florida Derby Bullet Work

Blue Grass Under Consideration for Blended Citizen

On Derby Trail, Horsemen Weigh Their Options

Turf Paradise Daily Results and Activity

Results

Tuesday, March 27
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Claiming – $3,500 $7,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 2 Claiming – $10,000 $8,500 Overnight Overnight
Race 3 Claiming – $3,000 $7,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 4 Claiming – $3,000 $7,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 5 Claiming – $16,000 $12,500 Overnight Overnight
Race 6 Claiming – $3,000 $7,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 7 Claiming – $3,500 $7,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 8 Claiming – $3,000 $7,000 Overnight Overnight



Early Entries

Monday, April 2 Overnight
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Claiming – $16,000 $14,000
Race 2 Maiden Optional Claiming – $30,000 $12,500
Race 3 Claiming – $5,000 $8,000
Race 4 Starter Optional Claiming – $5,000 $8,200
Race 5 Allowance $14,000
Race 6 Starter Optional Claiming – $5,000 $8,200
Race 7 Claiming – $3,000 $7,000
Race 8 Claiming – $8,500 $8,500

Final Entries

Saturday, March 31
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Allowance $5,200
Race 2 Maiden $4,000
Race 3 Arizona Stallion S. $30,000
Race 4 Claiming – $16,000 $14,000
Race 5 Wildcat H. $30,000
Race 6 Claiming – $3,000 $7,000
Race 7 Claiming – $3,500 $7,000
Race 8 Claiming – $6,250 $8,000

LOCAL HORSES OUT OF TOWN

Mike Anderson
Entries
March 28Turf Paradise

Run Harvey Run Race 6 Allowance
March 31Turf Paradise

Manning Race 8 Claiming $6,250

Results
March 26 – Turf Paradise
Astartobe finished 6th beaten 11 3/4 lengths Race 3 View Chart    
James R. Brown
Entries
March 31Turf Paradise

Power Corrupt Race 5 Wildcat H.
Fire Boss Race 7 Claiming $3,500
Toccet’s Charm Race 8 Claiming $6,250
Sandi Gann
Entries
March 27 – Turf Paradise

Sorryaboutnothing Race 5 Claiming $12,500
Philip Hall
Entries
March 28Turf Paradise

Tattooed Kitty Race 7 Allowance

Claims
March 26 – Turf Paradise
Peach Pike finished 3rd beaten 2 1/4 lengths Race 7 View Chart    

TODAYS BLOODHORSE NEWS

Fasig-Tipton Ready for Sale in New Spot on Calendar

With a new place on the sales calendar, and the distinction of being the only selected auction remaining in the juvenile marketplace, the Fasig-Tipton Gulfstream Sale of 2-year-olds in training will be renewed March 28.

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