Golden Gate Daily Results and Activity

Results

Saturday, January 25
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Maiden Claiming – $5,000 $10,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 2 Claiming – $4,000 $10,400 Overnight Overnight
Race 3 Maiden Claiming – $8,000 $10,500 Overnight Overnight
Race 4 Allowance Optional Claiming – $62,500 $32,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 5 Claiming – $20,000 $18,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 6 Claiming – $32,000 $24,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 7 Claiming – $20,000 $18,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 8 Allowance $31,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 9 Maiden Special Weight $30,000 Overnight Overnight

 

LOCAL HORSES OUT OF TOWN

James R. Brown
Entries
January 25 – Turf Paradise

Rocket Ship Race 6 Allowance Optional Claiming $15,000
January 26 – Turf Paradise

Inquisiteur Race 3 Maiden Claiming $7,500
January 27 – Turf Paradise

Donttellmyhusband Race 7 Claiming $3,000
Sandi Gann
Entries
January 25 – Turf Paradise

Celtic Warrior Race 1 Allowance Optional Claiming $20,000
January 27 – Turf Paradise

Boundary Bay Race 8 Allowance Optional Claiming $16,000
Philip Hall
Entries
January 26 – Turf Paradise

Stacked Race 4 Maiden Optional Claiming $30,000
Yes Please Race 8 Allowance Optional Claiming $10,000
Cindy Krasner
Entries
January 25 – Turf Paradise

Call Me Alvin Race 4 Maiden Claiming $7,500
Kerri Raven
Entries
January 25 – Turf Paradise

Chatterman Race 2 Claiming $20,000
Towards the Light Race 2 Claiming $20,000
January 26 – Turf Paradise

Top Hat Hustle Race 3 Maiden Claiming $7,500

BLOODHORSE RACING PREVIEW

Benoit Photo

Field of 10 to Square Off in Wide-Open Pegasus

Higher Power, Mucho Gusto, Tax the standouts in Gulfstream’s $3M grade 1 stakes. More…

Magic Wand Draws Outside Post 12 for Pegasus Turf

Galileo mare was installed as 7-2 morning-line favorite. More…

O’Brien, Brown Square Off in La Prevoyante

Pumpkin Rumble Looks to Do Battle in W. L. McKnight

Connections Take a Shot With Zulu Alpha in Pegasus Turf

Flagstaff, Ax Man Bring Eclipse Blood Into Palos Verdes

Billy Batts, Jack and Noah Head Texas Turf Mile

Free Enterprise to Make Stakes Debut in Hooper

Bravazo the Star Attraction in Fifth Season Division

Maker Tries for Eighth Connally Turf Cup Win

Serengeti Empress Headlines Houston Ladies Classic

Asmussen Sends Out Pair in Riley Allison Derby

Sir Winston Tentatively Entered in Jazil Stakes

World Traveler Magic Wand Returns for Pegasus Turf

Omaha Beach Scratched from Pegasus World Cup

Skin Rash Knocks Spun to Run Out of Pegasus

An Upset in the Pegasus World Cup?

MARIO WATCH

Mario Gutierrez
Entries
January 25 – Santa Anita

What a Family Wgt-122 Race 1 Maiden Special Weight
Knifes Edge Wgt-122 Race 4 Starter Optional Claiming $40,000
Madman Wgt-122 Race 5 Allowance Optional Claiming $40,000
Descartes Wgt-122 Race 7 Maiden Special Weight
Vodka Twist Wgt-122 Race 9 Maiden Special Weight
January 26 – Santa Anita

Hit the Seam Wgt-122 Race 5 Starter Allowance $50,000

Results
January 24 – Santa Anita
Yellow Shirt finished 5th beaten 15 1/2 lengths Race 2 Chart
Peedie finished 6th beaten 6 1/2 lengths Race 5 Chart

 

Equine Osteoarthritis: Early Interventions

Detecting and managing osteoarthritis in its early stages can go a long way toward keeping your horse sound, comfortable, and happy in his job for years to come. Read an excerpt of this article from our January 2020 issue of The Horse.

Equine OA: Early Interventions

Your 12-year-old sport horse has been coming out of the stall stiff, tracking up a bit short in the warmup, and just doesn’t feel like he’s giving his usual 100%. Before you simply shrug off these anomalies as age- or even weather-related, consider the real cause—they might be early indicators of osteoarthritis (OA). Detecting and managing osteoarthritis in its early stages can go a long way toward keeping your horse sound, comfortable, and happy in his job for years to come.

Suzan Oakley, DVM, Dipl. ACVSMR, ABVP, and Anne Moretta, VMD, MS, CVA, CVSMT, who work in private practice together at Wellington Equine Sports Medicine, in Florida, share their tips for keeping this ever-so-common wear and tear at bay.

What Is Osteoarthritis?

Arthritis is, simply, inflammation of the joint. “Osteoarthritis is a chronic, progressive disease,” says Oakley. “It can initially begin as synovitis, or inflammation of the synovial membrane which lines the joint surface. Eventually, synovitis results in changes to or degradation of the articular cartilage and can progress to include bony changes in the subchondral bone (the layer just below the cartilage surface) in chronic, long-term cases. Subtle pain is an important early clue that may indicate a joint-related problem.”

In sport horses osteoarthritis can develop in a variety of joints, says Moretta. “The majority of cases occur in limb joints that are used for propulsion or are subjected to more concussive weight-bearing,” she says. “The horse’s occupation (dressage, jumping, etc.) plays a role in the location and type of biomechanical loading and repeated stress the joints will have over time.” 

Recognizing Subtle Signs

To pick up on OA early, make sure you’re tuned in to any changes your horse might display in his overall movement and well-being. Prompt identification and intervention are critical to slowing the disease’s progression and keeping the horse agile.

“In private practice we have the opportunity to see and treat horses in the very early stages of the disease,” says Oakley. “Often, changes in movement patterns and (uneven) muscle development are evident before the horse is actually lame. It’s important to be aware of early signs of pain and to evaluate the whole horse.”

Other subtle indicators she says owners should be aware of include:

  • Stiffness that might improve with work;
  • Reduced range of motion of joints;
  • Heat and swelling;
  • Behavioral changes; and
  • Changes in posture.

It is important to give the horse the benefit of the doubt if he’s having behavioral problems, says Moretta. Difficult or “naughty” behavior might be a sign of physical discomfort. Also, “often, limitations in the horse’s athletic ability are labeled as poor performance and may not be recognized as early lameness,” she says. “While not specific to osteoarthritis, these behavioral signs may indicate subtle pain issues.”

Examining the Whole Horse

When performing a comprehensive evaluation of a horse that’s not quite right, Moretta first collects a complete history, including what issues the client has noticed, and discusses the horse’s occupation and the owner’s goals. From there, her complete assessment involves the axial skeleton (vertebral column), tendons, ligaments, joints, and associated muscles.

“Our approach is very much integrative, so we look at the whole horse,” says Moretta. “First, I’ll notice how the horse is standing and then evaluate movement at the walk from multiple angles and on differing surfaces. We want to analyze the horse’s preferred or ‘compensatory’ movement patterns. These include stride length, straightness, head/neck/back/hip movement, adduction or abduction (movement toward or away from the midline) of the limbs, and overall symmetry. I utilize motion palpation (part of the spinal manipulation exam) to evaluate all the joints in the body, focusing on the limbs and complete spine.”

The whole-horse exam is also good for determining which problems are primary and which are secondary, she says. In addition, checking diagnostic acupuncture points can be very helpful.

Oakley believes owners and veterinarians often overlook muscles, posture, and movement patterns when evaluating these horses. “We want to identify areas of decreased (restricted) or increased (hypermobile) joint motion,” she says. “It is important to treat these affected joints early to reduce inflammation and minimize joint damage. We need an accurate diagnosis to be able to manage pain and to prevent further injury.

“Generally, I’ll start my exam on the opposite ‘corner’ from the lame leg, going over the entire horse,” she continues. “We look at where the clues lead us. Is the horse painful on flexion tests? Is the movement exam abnormal? We let the exam guide our imaging. X rays are the first step, providing information about the bone. A combination of X ray and ultrasound can be extremely helpful in many cases, especially in the stifles and neck.”

For instance, ultrasound provides information about the soft tissue and bone surface interface, Oakley says, and is much more sensitive than X ray for detecting osteophytes (bone spurs).

Also, don’t limit soundness exams solely to when problems are brewing, says Moretta. “When we do periodic performance exams, we look for subclinical (not observable) changes,” she says. “We can use motion palpation to screen for very subtle lameness problems when doing periodic evaluations.”

She says she uses the diagnostic subtle movement or muscle changes to dictate treatment and help prevent long-term and potentially career-ending lameness down the road.

January 2020 Issue Cover​This article continues in the January 2020 issue of The Horse: Your Guide to Equine Health Care. Subscribe now and get an immediate download of this issueincluding this in-depth article on how tackling osteoarthritis in its early stages can go a long way toward keeping your horse sound, comfortable, and happy in his job for years to come.

Already a magazine subscriber? Digital subscribers can access their January issue here. Domestic print subscribers who have not received their copy should email circulation@thehorse.com.

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Freelance journalist Natalie DeFee Mendik is a multiple American Horse Publications editorial and graphics awards winner specializing in equestrian media. She holds an MA in English from Colorado State University and an International Federation of Journalists’ International press card, and is a member of the International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists. With over three decades of horse experience, Natalie’s main equine interests are dressage and vaulting. Having lived and ridden in England, Switzerland, and various parts of the United States, Natalie currently resides in Colorado with her husband and two girls.

Santa Anita Daily Results and Activity

Results

Friday, January 24
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Maiden Special Weight $55,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 2 Maiden Special Weight $55,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 3 Starter Allowance – $25,000 $35,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 4 Claiming – $32,000 $35,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 5 Maiden Claiming – $20,000 $20,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 6 Claiming – $16,000 $22,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 7 Claiming – $50,000 $43,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 8 Maiden Claiming – $30,000 $23,000 Overnight Overnight



Final Entries

Sunday, January 26
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Claiming – $25,000 $25,000
Race 2 Starter Allowance – $25,000 $35,000
Race 3 Maiden Special Weight $55,000
Race 4 Maiden Special Weight $55,000
Race 5 Starter Allowance – $50,000 $33,000
Race 6 Starter Allowance – $50,000 $33,000
Race 7 Clocker’s Corner S. $70,000
Race 8 Claiming – $12,500 $18,000

Oaklawn Park Daily Results and Activity

Results

Friday, January 24
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Waiver Claiming – $20,000 $36,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 2 Maiden Claiming – $25,000 $30,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 3 Starter Allowance – $8,000 $28,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 4 Maiden Special Weight $85,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 5 Claiming – $12,500 $26,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 6 Maiden Special Weight $85,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 7 Allowance Optional Claiming – $80,000 $89,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 8 Smarty Jones S. $150,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 9 Allowance Optional Claiming – $80,000 $86,000 Overnight Overnight



Final Entries

Sunday, January 26
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Claiming – $25,000 $31,000
Race 2 Waiver Maiden Claiming – $25,000 $30,000
Race 3 Waiver Claiming – $12,500 $26,000
Race 4 Claiming – $16,000 $29,000
Race 5 Allowance $86,000
Race 6 Maiden Special Weight $85,000
Race 7 Allowance Optional Claiming – $80,000 $86,000
Race 8 Allowance Optional Claiming – $50,000 $88,000
Race 9 Waiver Maiden Claiming – $25,000 $30,000

Golden Gate Daily Results and Activity

Results

Friday, January 24
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Maiden Claiming – $8,000 $10,500 Overnight Overnight
Race 2 Claiming – $16,000 $19,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 3 Claiming – $12,500 $17,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 4 Starter Allowance – $50,000 $19,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 5 Maiden Claiming – $8,000 $10,500 Overnight Overnight
Race 6 Starter Allowance – $50,000 $19,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 7 Claiming – $40,000 $25,000 Overnight Overnight
Race 8 Claiming – $4,000 $10,400 Overnight Overnight



Early Entries

Thursday, January 30 Overnight
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Claiming – $4,000 $11,000
Race 2 Claiming – $12,500 $17,000
Race 3 Claiming – $8,000 $13,000
Race 4 Maiden Claiming – $12,500 $11,000
Race 5 Claiming – $10,000 $15,000
Race 6 Claiming – $4,000 $10,400
Race 7 Maiden Claiming – $12,500 $11,000

Final Entries

Sunday, January 26
Race# Race Type Purse
Race 1 Maiden Claiming – $8,000 $10,500
Race 2 Claiming – $8,000 $12,500
Race 3 Maiden Claiming – $5,000 $10,000
Race 4 Claiming – $8,000 $12,500
Race 5 Maiden Special Weight $30,000
Race 6 Claiming – $12,500 $17,000
Race 7 Claiming – $3,200 $10,000
Race 8 Claiming – $20,000 $18,000
Race 9 Claiming – $4,000 $10,400